Cinephile’s Reassessing Anime Issue

Cinephile, vol. 7, no. 1: Reassessing Anime cover

The good folks at Cinephile, the student journal put out by the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver, recently sent me a copy of their special Reassessing Anime issue. I haven’t had a chance to read it yet, but its list of international contributors is certainly impressive—though I’m surprised there’s no UBC students or faculty among them—which includes Philip Brophy, author of 100 Anime, on “The Sound of an Android’s Soul: Music, Muzak, and MIDI in Time of Eve, and Paul Wells, author of Understanding Animation, on “Playing the Kon Trick: Between Dates, Dimensions and Daring in the films of Satoshi Kon.” It’s available at several Vancouver bookstores or you can subscribe here.

Astro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas — The Google eBook Edition

Astro Boy and Anime coverAstro Boy and Anime Come to the Americas, the book I helped Fred Ladd write about his involvement with anime (as producer and adapter of films/programs for the American market), as well as his view of the post-Astro Boy history of Japanese animation, is now available as a Google eBook. (It can be ordered here.)

The list price is $24.99 versus $35.00 for the original softcover edition, which is still available from MacFarland and various online booksellers). However, Google is currently selling it for $14.74, which is marginally cheaper than the  $14.99 Kindle edition. The latter originally sold for $9.99, but the new pricing reflects the increased leverage publishers now have in pricing e-books.

Google eBooks, which officially debuted today, will be available from a variety of sellers, including independent bookstores, so you are not stuck with one vendor as is currently the case with, for instance, Kindle eBooks. I did quickly check the Powell’s Books website and found the book selling for $23.12, but I suspect pricing will vary widely as the market matures.

Frames of Anime

Frames of Anime: Culture and Image Building coverI just received a copy of Tze-Yue G. (“Gigi”) Hu’s long-awaited Frames of Anime: Culture and Image-Building recently published by Hong Kong University Press, and distributed in North America by University of Washington Press ($28.00 paperback and $55.00 hardcover). Gigi, who teaches Asian Studies at the University of Oklahoma’s School of International and Area Studies, is someone I’ve known and liked for many years. Thus, when she asked me to write a blurb for her book, I was quite happy to do so. My blurb, which accurately sums up my opinion, was that:

Frames of Anime provides a wonderfully concise and insightful historical overview of Japanese animation; more importantly, Tze-yue G. Hu also gives the reader a much-needed frame of reference—cultural and historical—for understanding its development.